Russian document translation services in Abuja

Looking for Russian document translation services in Abuja!

Here at Novatia translations limited Russian translation desk, we work with professional, native-speaker  and certified translators to guarantee accurate translations that respect cultural and stylistic details. our real world language capacity enable us to deliver translations from and into Russian language. our Russian document translation are carried out by top language translators around the world with the thorough knowledge of the subject matter involved – be it a technical documentation, marketing material, or a user manual.

Our Russian document translation services in Abuja involves:

  • Sworn Russian document translation services in Abuja
  • Certified Russian document translation services in Abuja
  • Notarized Russian document translation services in Abuja

Engaging Russian Document translation services

It’s true that the Russian culture differs from that of English-speaking countries. But that doesn’t mean that Russian speakers aren’t interested in English content.

Consider that retail is a huge industry in Russia. Globalization has increased the permeability of previously closed cultures,so the availability of and demand for foreign products is high.

Selling your products to another country such as Russia means you’ll need a reliable Russian translation service. Everything from instruction manuals to packaging needs professional translation to help Russian consumers use your goods correctly and safely.

The industrial sector is also big in Russia. Any trade of raw materials, parts, or machinery from that country will require the best English to Russian translation as well as the best Russian to English translation.

  • English to Russian Document translation services
  • Russian to English Russian Document translation services
  • Russian to French Document translation services
  • Russian to other languages

     TRANSLATING YOUR DOCUMENTS FROM ENGLISH – RUSSIAN , RUSSIAN – ENGLISH IN ABUJA.

You were told in the Russian embassy in Abuja that to process your Visa you are required to translate your documents to the Russian language. You are at the right place. We are Novatia Russian translation services.

Russian document translation services in Lagos

    Russian Document translation services in Lagos

Highly rated Russian translation services for businesses and individuals.

Lagos, Nigeria

A team of Russian translators /Russian interpreters are ready to translate your texts into Russian or engage your reach with solid Russian interpretation services

Whether you work in marketing, construction, agriculture, logistics, law or information technology, our professional translators can provide a loyal and fluent translation from English into Russian. By contracting the services of a professional translation agency, you ensure your international reputation and avoid any potential linguistic mishaps.

The scope of our Russian translation services:

English to Russian document translation services

French to Russian document translation services

German to Russian document translation services

Spanish to Russian Document translation services

Finnish to Russian document translation services

Polish to Russian document translation services

Czech to Russian document translation services

Slovak to Russian document translation services

Slovenian to Russian document translation services

Hungarian to Russian document translation services

Romanian to Russian document translation services

Bulgarian to Russian document translation services

Lithuanian to Russian document translation services

Estonian to Russian document translation services

Swedish to Russian document translation services

Norwegian to Russian document translation services

Danish to Russian document translation services
Icelandic to Russian document translation services
Ukrainian to Russian document translation services
Italian to Russian document translation services
Russian to English document translation services
Russian to French document translation services
Russian to German document translation services
Russian to Lithuanian document translation services
Russian to Hungarian document translation services
Russian to Finnish document translation services
Russian to Bulgarian document translation services
Russian to Italian document translation services
Russian to Latvian document translation services
Russian to English document translation services
Russian to Swedish document translation services

About LAGOS

Lagos, city and chief port, Lagos stateNigeria. Until 1975 it was the capital of Lagos state, and until December 1991 it was the federal capital of Nigeria. Ikeja replaced Lagos as the state capital, and Abuja replaced Lagos as the federal capital. Lagos, however, remained the unofficial seat of many government agencies. The city’s population is centred on Lagos Island, in Lagos Lagoon, on the Bight of Benin in the Gulf of Guinea. Lagos is Nigeria’s largest city and one of the largest in sub-Saharan Africa.

The topography of Lagos is dominated by its system of islands, sandbars, and lagoons. The city itself sprawls over what used to be the four main islands: Lagos, Iddo (now attached to the mainland), Ikoyi (now attached to Lagos Island), and Victoria (now the tip of the Lekki Peninsula); because of land reclamation efforts over the years, some of the original main islands are no longer true islands. A system of bridges connect some of Lagos’s islands to each other and to the mainland. All the territory is low-lying, the highest point on Lagos Island being only 22 feet (7 metres) above sea level.

Spanish Consular requirement for document legalization and translation

Translation of documents by Sworn translator and interpreter – Get your document translated through our partners in Spain.

Legalisations
Legalisation is an administrative act whereby a foreign public document is validated, by verifying the authenticity of the signature on the document, and the capacity in which the signatory of the document has acted.
Unless there is a legal instrument providing exemption from that obligation, all foreign public documents must be legalised in order to be valid in Spain, and all Spanish public documents must be legalised to be valid abroad. Answers to the most frequently-asked questions are listed below.

In which cases is legalisation not necessary?
Given the growing number of exchanges between the world’s different countries, many of them—including Spain—have signed agreements to facilitate these formalities for their citizens.

The most relevant agreement of this kind currently in force is the 12th Hague Convention, of 5 October 1961, Abolishing the Requirement of Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents, more commonly known as the Apostille Convention.

Many countries have adhered to this Treaty, which simplifies procedures for issuers and recipients. This legal text establishes that between Member States legalisation is not necessary for mutual recognition of documents, although a seal, or apostille, is required. Anyone needing this may obtain information at the Ministry of Justice (Calle de la Bolsa, 8. 28071 Madrid Tel. +34 902 007 214). This is the complete list of countries that have signed the Agreement.

Moreover, there are other Agreements exempting certain documents from legalisation. This information text drafted by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation lists the countries and the types of documents to which these exemptions are applicable.

For any cases not included in the abovementioned agreements, legalisation is necessary.

Which documents may be legalised?
Both original documents and authentic copies issued by Public Administration Authorities may be legalised, as well as copies attested by a Notary Public upon exhibition of the original.

How much does it cost to legalise a document?
Legalisation is free of charge when carried out by the Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel: +34 91 379 16 55). If carried out at an Embassy or Consulate of Spain, it shall involve payment of a fee. For more specific information, it is advisable to directly contact the corresponding representation of Spain abroad.

Do legalisations expire?
No. Legalisations do not have an expiry date. However, if the document issued has a limited duration, so shall the legalisation thereof. Nor is there any deadline for requesting the legalisation of a document. Legalisation may be carried out at any time when the interested party so requests.

Which documents issued by Spanish authorities are intended for use abroad?
Of all the documents issued by Spanish authorities, the following may have effects abroad:

Documents issued by the General State Administration
This category includes documents issued by national Spanish authorities and officials, public bodies and entities within its structure, and Social Security management bodies.

Their legalisation must firstly be carried out by the Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1– 28002 Madrid. Tel: +34 91 379 16 55), and secondly by the Embassies and Consulates in Spain of the country where the document is to have effect.

Documents issued by Spain’s Autonomous Communities
This category includes documents issued by Spain’s regional authorities, officials and public bodies.

Their legalisation must be carried out, in the following order, by: the Legalisations Unit of the respective Autonomous Community (this list includes the addresses and contact information for all of them); the Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel: +34 91 379 16 55) and by the Embassies and Consulates in Spain of the country in which the document is to take effect.

Documents issued by local corporations (City Councils, Provincial Councils, Insular Councils and other types of local government)
The legalisation of these documents is the responsibility, firstly, of the Ministry of the Treasury and Public Administrations, with two exceptions. The first exception involves documents from Madrid City Hall, which may be legalised directly at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation. The second exception is of a general nature, and opens up the channel of legalisation through the judiciary or through a notary public for everyone.

Subsequently, legalisation shall be the responsibility of the Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel: +34 91 379 16 55) and, finally, at the diplomatic or consular mission, accredited to Spain, of the country in which the document is to take effect.

Notarised documents
Certain documents must be attested by a notary public: public deeds, recognition of signatures, certifications, and many others.

These shall be legalised by a notary public, in the following order: public notaries, chambers of notaries (see the following list of chambers of notaries in Spain), Ministry of Justice – Legalisations (C/ de la Bolsa, 8 – 28071 Madrid Tel. +34 902 007 214), Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel: +34 91 379 16 55), and, finally, at the diplomatic or consular mission, accredited to Spain, of the country in which the document is to take effect.

Judicial documents
This category includes, among others, birth certificates, marriage certificates, death certificates, certificates of marriage capacity, life certificates and marital status certificates, and court rulings.

All these documents require legalisation by the judiciary. Those in charge of carrying out legalisations are, in the following order: the High Court of Justice of the corresponding Autonomous Community (the addresses can be found on this list); Ministry of Justice – Legalisations (C/ de la Bolsa, 8 – 28071 Madrid Tel. +34 902 007 214), Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel:  +34 91 379 16 55), and, finally, at the diplomatic or consular mission, accredited to Spain, of the country in which the document is to take effect.

Mercantile documents
These include certificates of origin, free sales certificates, company invoices, and many other commercial documents. Different authorities are responsible for their legalisation, depending on the nature of the document.

– Documents regarding exports shall be legalised by the Chamber of Commerce of the corresponding province or, failing that, the High Council of Chambers of Commerce, Industry and Navigation (C/ Ribera del Loira 12 – 28042 Madrid. Tel:  +34 91 590 69 00).
– Bank documents may be legalised by different authorities. If they were issued by the Bank of Spain, legalisation can be carried out at any of its offices (see list). Those issued by nationwide banking institutions may be legalised at the central offices of that bank, or at their offices in Madrid, or at the Bank of Spain. Finally, those issued by local banks without central services in Madrid may be legalised at the provincial delegations of the Bank of Spain. Legalisation by a notary public is also possible for bank documents.

In any case, mercantile documents shall always go through the Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel: +34 91 379 16 55), and, finally, at the diplomatic or consular mission, accredited to Spain, of the country in which the document is to take effect, in order to complete their legalisation process.

Sworn Translations from Spanish into other languages
These translations must have been made by a sworn translator or interpreter certified by Spain’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation. In each case, ask the Embassy or Consulate of the country where the document is to have effect whether the official Spanish translation is already valid there. If not, it must be legalised by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation.

Academic documents
Each type of transcript or certificate requires different steps for its legalisation.

Official higher education documents
These are valid throughout Spanish territory. University degrees must be legalised by the Deputy Directorate-General for Degrees and Recognition of Qualifications (Paseo del Prado, Nº 28 Entreplanta – 28014 Madrid). Non-university degrees must be legalised by the Service for Degrees and Validation of Foreign Non-University Studies (C/ Los Madrazo, nº 15 3ª planta – 28071 Madrid). Both are within the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport.

Official non-higher education documents
These are issued by teaching centres in Spain’s Autonomous Communities. They are legalised by the Regional Department of Education or its equivalent in the corresponding Autonomous Community.

Non-official documents issued by private institutions
In these cases, legalisation must be carried out by a notary public, a chamber of notaries (see the following list of chambers of notaries in Spain), or by the Directorate-General for Registers and Notaries of the Ministry of Justice (C/ de la Bolsa, 8 – 28012 Madrid).

In any case, the procedure shall not be complete until it has been validated by the Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel:  +34 91 379 16 55), and the Diplomatic or Consular Mission accredited in Spain of the country where the document is to have effect.

Documents of religious organisations
Documents of the Roman Catholic Church must be legalised by the Apostolic Nunciature and/or the Diocese, and by the Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel:  +34 91 379 16 55). This procedure can also be carried out through a notary public.

As for documents issued by other religious authorities, two types can be distinguished:

– Documents recorded in Civil Registries in Spain, such as Koranic, Rabbinical or Evangelical marriages, shall require legalisation by: the High Court of Justice of the Autonomous Community whose Civil Registry issued the marriage certificate, the Legalisations Unit of the Ministry of Justice (C/ San Bernardo, nº 45 – 28071 Madrid. Tel:  +34 91 390 20 10) and the Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation (C/ Pechuán, 1 – 28002 Madrid. Tel:  +34 91 379 16 55).
– Documents not recorded in Spanish Civil Registries must be legalised by a notary public.

In both cases, the last stage of the legalization process shall be the legalization by the diplomatic or consular mission, accredited to Spain, of the country in which the document is to take effect.

Medical certificates
The physician must fill in the corresponding official form, sign it and stamp it with the seal accrediting membership of the medical association. Subsequently, if legalisation is required, this is carried out by the General Council of Official Medical Associations of Spain (Plaza de las Cortes, 11 4º – 28014 Madrid. Tel:  +34 91 431 77 80) or by the Official Medical Association of each Province. The list of these Associations can be found at the following website.

Veterinary certificates
 After a certificate is issued by the veterinarian, it is necessary to address the corresponding Government Delegation or Subdelegation, where a pet health certificate shall be issued.

This certificate must be legalised:

– At the Directorate-General for Agricultural Production and Markets of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and the Environment, at C/ Almagro, 33, Madrid (phone no. +34 913 473 695).
– At the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation – Legalisations Section.
– And, finally, at the Diplomatic or Consular Mission accredited in Spain of the country where the document is to have effect. It is advisable to check with said Mission regarding other possible requirements that may affect exporting pets to the destination country.

Can legalisation of a document be denied?
Yes. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation shall not legalise documents in the following cases:

– When the original document submitted is not a public document or a private document given public document status by a notary public.
– When it does not contain the prior legalisations from other authorities established by regulations.
–  When the signatures to be legalised are not deposited in the Registry of the Legalisations Section of the Ministry.

However, any denial may be appealed through the channels established by Spanish legislation (Act 30/1992 on the Legal System of the Public Administrations and Common Administrative Procedure).

Which foreign documents can be legalised for their use in Spain?
The Legalisations Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation shall only admit:

– Original public documents
– Copies of these documents issued by the issuing body.
– Copies, certified by Spain’s representations abroad, of documents that have previously been legalised through diplomatic channels or bear the apostille
– Notarised copies

Do documents to be legalised require translation?
For those documents issued by Spanish authorities that are to have effect abroad, the interested party must consult local legislation, which is the legislation establishing the possible need for translation. Most countries usually only accept documents in their official language(s).

Foreign documents that are to have effect in Spain must be translated into Spanish. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation shall only admit official translations:

– Translated in Spain by a sworn translator or interpreter certified by the Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation. (These translations are exempt from legalisation and are valid without any further formalities)

– Translated or accepted by a Spanish Representation abroad. (These translations require legalisation by the relevant Section of Spian’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation.)

– Translated by the Diplomatic or Consular Representation in Spain of the State issuing the document. (These translations require legalisation by the relevant Section of Spain’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation.)

What is legalisation through diplomatic channels, and in which cases is it used?
Legalisation through diplomatic channels is the procedure applied to legalise foreign public documents issued by States that are not signatories to agreements aimed at facilitating these formalities. In general, it means that each of the authorities involved legalises the document in question on an individual basis.

If the document was issued by a non-consular authority in the document’s country of origin, the only authority involved shall be the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the State of origin, as well as the Spanish Diplomatic or Consular Representation in said State.

If the document was issued by a Consular authority duly accredited in Spain, only the Legalisations Section of Spain’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation shall be involved in the legalisation.

Pursuant to the regulations applicable to each case, the following documents are exempt from legalisation:

• Academic documents presented at the Registries of the Embassies and Consulates of Spain
• Academic documents presented at the Registry of the Ministry of Education of Spain

Foreign documents legalised by the Consulates or Embassies of Spain abroad, bearing a transparent security label, do not need to be legalised at this Legalisations Section.

How are documents concerning trade in war materiel or similar goods legalised?
Foreign documents concerning transactions in defence or dual-use  materials  (those that can have both military and civilian use) may be legalised by the Representation of Spain in the issuing country and/or by the Representation of the issuing State in Spain. In both cases, the formalities must be carried out by a diplomat with a signature registered at the Legalisations Section of this Ministry.

Documents of this nature also require subsequent legalisation by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation.

Which documents issued by Foreign Embassies and Consulates in Spain are legalised directly by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation?
The foreign Representations in Spain included on this list issue certain documents, such as certificates of criminal record and certificates of acts recorded in local Civil Registries, which are legalised directly by the Legalisations Section, resulting in less inconvenience for citizens.

Formalities for legalising documents may, in certain cases, be complicated, time-consuming and cumbersome for those interested. Bearing this in mind, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation has set up a hotline at +34 91 379 16 55 and an email address, legalizaciones@maec.es, so that the public may clarify any doubts. In all email correspondence, please include your name, address and contact phone number.

 

How to become a Sworn translator in Spain?

Without a doubt, sworn translation denotes a qualification that is respected by clients and the marketplace in general as well as a level of unquestionable ethical and professional commitment.

legalisation of documents at the ministry of foreign affairs in Nigeria

Sworn translation entails a declaration on behalf of the translator of the authenticity and equivalence of whatever has been translated with respect to the original material. The sworn translator assumes responsibility for his work in a personal and non-transferrable manner. In fact, faced with possible discrepancies concerning the contents of a specific translation, the person involved is entitled to ask for it to be revised by experts at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores).

Having said that, we will proceed directly to the necessary requirements and steps to be taken to obtain this highly-coveted qualification. There are two ways to obtain it:

1. Possession of a degree in translation and interpretation which proves – always with reference to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation – you have passed a fixed number of credits in specific subjects. See article 5 of the above-mentioned order “exemption from examinations”.

2. Official examination of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation’s Office of Interpretation of Languages (Oficina de Interpretación de Lenguas del Ministerios de Asuntos Exteriores y Cooperación).

The relevant information about this examination is to be found in the Order of the 8th of February, 1996 (BOE number 47 of February 23rd, 1996). You may find this regulation on the BOE’s own website or in the section concerning sworn interpreters on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation’s website. The requirements to be admitted to the examination are clearly stated in the above-mentioned Order:

  • to be of age;
  • to possess a degree from a Spanish university (or one which is recognized by the Spanish government);
  • to possess Spanish nationality or that of any other nation in the EU.

We won’t go into detail here concerning those topics which the regulation makes sufficiently clear. Nonetheless, we feel it is important to point out that:

  • Official announcement of examinations: it is best to become thoroughly familiar with the MAEC’s website in order to be clear, above all, about the deadlines for presentation of one’s application. You can download the form from the sworn interpreters’ own section of the MAEC. It’s one single easy-to-fill-in form (you have to attach to the form the receipt proving payment of the stipulated amount relating to examination rights).
  • The examination: consists of 4 exams to be carried out in two phases (on different days). The first one, which is preliminary, includes three tests of written translation (two without the aid of a dictionary and the other with dictionary-tending to be on a legal subject). The translations presented are texts of a journalistic kind (about scientific, historical, political subjects…) and feature a high degree of difficulty. Here we might mention a piece of advice that we feel is essential if you are to be successful in the exam: the exams are intended to be carried out within a relatively short space of time. Therefore, don’t waste time making rough drafts or getting “stuck” on difficult expressions. What is needed, after a brief preliminary analysis, is “to get straight to the point” (if you don’t know something, it’s better to leave it out and go back later with the best translation you can come up with). One more thing: try to be clear and tidy in writing and presentation. There is a pause of about twenty minutes between the first two papers and the third which, as we said, is generally of a legal nature and done with the aid of a dictionary. Once this first phase is over, the Office of Interpretation of Languages makes known the results of those who are admitted to the so-called “fourth exam” to be held about six weeks later.
  • The fourth exam: is an oral exam which consists of a brief commentary with regard to a similarly brief text on a varying range of subjects (in general, they deal with current affairs). The candidate is allowed to read the text and to take notes-if she wishes-in order to answer a number of simple questions on the subject asked subsequently by the tribunal. There’s not much you can do to prepare for this exam: the best thing is to go in plenty of time, stay calm and take your time to read and thoroughly comprehend the text. Indeed, this last exam constitutes a formality which the MAEC reserves to confirm that the great preparation and culture you will have shown in the first exam corresponds with accurate mastery of the spoken language.

After all this, in two or three weeks, the MAEC publishes the definitive list of sworn interpreters which, subsequently, will be published in the BOE. Bear in mind that the appointment is not official until actual publication of the afore-mentioned list in the BOE. In any case, one step you can start to take after publication of the list in the MAE is to register your signature in the government delegation of the province where you intend to practice the profession (at the current time, you are required to present your degree, or a certified photocopy of the same, photocopy of your national ID card and three passport-size photographs, although it might be best if you speak directly to the relevant officials prior to taking the documentation). What’s more, this is the point at which you register the stamp of interpreter. That is to say, you have to take the stamp to the government delegation. The requirements and characteristics that this stamp must possess are very clear and are featured in article 7 of the Order of February the 23rd, 1996. One last piece of advice: once you are in possession of the qualification, send a letter to the Office of Interpretation of Languages along with your personal information and prices. If you don’t do so, you won’t appear on the official list of the MAEC’s translators.

To finish off, we wish you every success in the exams (if you don’t succeed at the first attempt, there’s always the next time exams are convoked: don’t give up hope) and, in the future, a successful career as sworn translators.

French to English Translation Services

French to English Translation Services

Our network of skilled and certified French translators can translate French documents to English with unparalleled accuracy. When it comes to certified translation in French to English, our professional translators consider varied crucial specifications along with customer’s demands. In fact they give utmost emphasis while handling official translation for French to English documents.

 

Things to know when translating from French to English

1. Don’t translate idiomatic expressions literally.

There are many French expressions that shouldn’t be taken literally when translating French to English. The literal translation won’t reflect the meaning of the expression. If you come across an expression that, when translated literally makes no sense in context, you’ve probably found an idiomatic expression.

Here are some examples of French idiomatic expressions and how they can be translated into English:

  • une bouche d’incendie – fire hydrant (Since “bouche” means “mouth” in English, “a mouth of fire” isn’t a correct translation!)
  • une bonne fourchette – a hearty eater (or, literally, “a good fork,” but that lacks meaning to English speakers!)
  • faire le pont – to make a long weekend (literally, to make a bridge, but it refers to the French habit of taking a four-day break by adding Friday or Monday to the weekend plus the mid-week day that a holiday falls on)

To improve your skills when translating French to English, try to learn as many idiomatic expressions as possible. If you’re listening to a French speaker and you don’t understand an expression they use, inquire as to the meaning so you can continue to build your knowledge base. Over time, this will make French translation easier and more rapid as you draw on the knowledge you already possess.

2. Use online forums and dictionaries to get help when needed.

When translating French to English, sometimes you can get stuck with certain expressions or usages. If you just can’t figure out how to appropriately translate something, forums like WordReference offer valuable help from native French speakers and highly knowledgeable second-language French speakers. There is a huge archive of threads covering a wide range of topics in French, so you can type in a phrase or word to learn more details about it. After all, when possible it is always in your best interest to use human translation for the most accurate understanding.

Online French dictionaries are another excellent resource. A well-respected one is Larousse. Here, you can access a French-English dictionary, as well as a French monolingual dictionary, in which you can find words and definitions all in French. The monolingual dictionary can be an especially great way to increase your knowledge and your proficiency in French as you research your translation query.

3. Use cognates, but watch out for false cognates.

Cognates are a great help when trying to increase fluency in a language and translate quickly. Here is a short list of French-English cognates:

  • immense – immense
  • amusant – amusing, fun
  • la page – the page
  • la musique – the music
  • la tomate – the tomato
  • le candidat – the candidate
  • l’hôpital – the hospital

4. You caanot afford to gamble with your official translations get help from Novatia translations NG