Conference Interpretation services in Kaduna

Conference interpretation Services in Kaduna | Interpreters in Kaduna, Nigeria


Our conference interpreters in Kaduna provide language support in specialist fields for over 205 languages.
Our Kaduna conference interpreters are able to assist in all contexts, from business meetings to conferences, from depositions to in court.
Language barriers may arise in any setting in Kaduna, whether there for a business meeting, conference or just to experience the many cultural attractions of the city.
We tailor our conference interpreting services in Kaduna to individual requirements to ensure well-informed language support of the highest standard. We can also provide extra project support, organisational assistance, translation services and cultural advice in addition to all forms of interpreting.
Whether in Nigeria’s capital Abuja or Kaduna for a conference, an exhibition or another business event, our interpreters are experienced in the relevant field, ensuring smooth and well-informed business communications every time.
We Provide conference interpretation services in Kaduna in the following areas:
-Simultaneous Interpretation services in Kaduna
Interpretation is delivered in most instances by more than conference interpreters (although sometimes three are required), and usually from a booth. The interpreters listen to the speaker (in the source language) through a headset and simultaneously interpret the speech into the target language via a microphone. Simultaneous interpretation is common for conferences that involve several different languages and a large number of participants.
-Consecutive interpretation services in Kaduna
Although less common, consecutive interpreting may also be required at conferences. This may be to assist during panel discussions, Q&A (Question & Answer) sessions or perhaps in a situation where a company or organisation wishes to speak face-to-face with exhibiting businesses. In these instances, interpretation can be two-way; it becomes a facilitating process which allows for communication between interested parties rather than one-way simultaneous.

Kaduna, city, capital of Kaduna state, north-central Nigeria. It lies along the Kaduna River, which is a major tributary of the Niger River.

Sir Frederick (later Lord) Lugard, the first British governor of Northern Nigeria, selected the present site along the Lagos-Kano Railway for a town, and building began in 1913. In 1917 Kaduna (a Hausa word for “crocodiles”) replaced Zungeru, 100 miles (160 km) west-southwest, as the capital of the Northern Provinces; it also served as capital of the Northern Region from 1954 to 1967. Lugard Hall, the legislative assembly building constructed in simplified Islamic style, stands at the head of the main street. The assassination in Kaduna of Sir Ahmadu Bellosardauna (sultan) of Sokoto and Northern premier, in an Igbo (Ibo) military coup in January 1966 led to the Nigerian Civil War (1967–70).

ABOUT KADUNA

Since the late 1950s, Kaduna has become a major industrial, commercial, and financial centre for the northern states of Nigeria. It has a branch of the Nigerian Stock Exchange. Most industries are grouped south of the Kaduna River near the main railway junction. The city has cotton-textile spinning and weaving mills; knit fabrics are also produced in Kaduna. The food industry produces beer, soft drinks, baked goods, and processed meat. Light manufactures include leather goods, plastics, ceramics, pharmaceuticals, furniture, and televisions; and there are several printing and publishing firms. The city’s heavy industries make steel and aluminum products, cement, asbestos cement, concrete blocks, electrical motors, ordnance, and explosives. There are a steel-rolling plant, an automobile assembly factory, and an oil refinery (supplied by an oil pipeline from the Niger delta oil fields). A petrochemicals plant began operations in the early 1980s. Kaduna is also a centre for the construction industry. The city serves as a collecting point for cotton, peanuts (groundnuts), shea nuts, and hides and skins; there is also a considerable local trade in sorghum, millet, corn (maize), kola nuts, goats, poultry, and cattle.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *